Developmental Asset #13: Neighbourhood Boundaries

As neighbours, it is in everyone’s best interest that we remain aware of the youth in our community and what they are doing.Young people need to know that they are not just accountable to themselves, their families, and their schools, but to the community at large. As a neighbour, here are some ways you can help support youth and their parents.

 

  1. It is important to let a child’s parents know if they are misbehaving in your neighbourhood, but it is equally important to relay praise for responsible behaviour and acts of kindness. Reinforce good behaviour by acknowledging it.

 

  1. Meet the parents of your children’s friends. If your preteens are going on outings unsupervised, communicate with the other parents to agree on plans and coordinate pick-up times.

 

  1. Make your home one that kids want to come to. Maintain authority in your home, but be welcoming.

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Parenting Preteens with a Purpose: Navigating the Middle Years by Kate Thomsen and The Best of Building Assets Together: Favorite Group Activities That Help Youth Succeed by Jolene Roehlkepartain

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

Developmental Asset #9: Service to Others

This is closely related to Developmental Asset #8: Youth As Resources. Young people are empowered when they have opportunities to serve others, especially when it becomes part of their regular routine. There are many ways for your adolescent to provide meaningful service. Here are just a few.

 

  1. Encourage your teen to organize or join a cleanup crew for a residential area or park.

 

  1. Work together with your teen to help someone in need. Help an older neighbour with yard work or household maintenance. Bring food to someone in your community who is grieving or sick. Maybe ask Miss Lisa at Phoenix, who runs our Care Program, whether there are any Phoenix families who could benefit from your help or support.

 

  1. Volunteer together for a charity. If you make financial contributions, consider helping your teen to do so as well. Ask them whether they have their own cause in mind that they would like to support.

 

  1. Provide foster care for a pet through your local animal shelter.

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis and The Best of Building Assets Together: Favorite Group Activities That Help Youth Succeed by Jolene Roehlkepartain

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

Developmental Asset #8: Youth As Resources

A community serves its young people well when it treats them as valuable resources. As parents, teachers, and community members, here are a few ways you can empower adolescents by giving them useful roles.

 

  1. If you’re in charge of a charity fundraiser, celebration, or other event, involve your teenagers. Give them meaningful tasks so that they can contribute to your event’s success. If you run a business or charity, employ young people and help them succeed at the jobs you give them.

 

  1. Encourage your teens to support their peers, to listen and be there for them when they need help. Being a supportive friend is good for your teen’s self-esteem.

 

  1. Encourage your teens to act as positive role models for younger children. Maybe get them involved in Phoenix’s mentorship program. If you have a younger child, encourage positive relationships with well-adjusted teens who share their interests.

 

  1. Encourage entrepreneurship in teens. Hire neighbourhood kids to shovel your walk, mow your lawn, or babysit. Encourage your own teens to think of creative ways to earn money through their own marketable skills.

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

Developmental Asset #7: Community Values Youth

It is an asset for adolescents to perceive that they are valued by the adults in their community. As an adult member of your own community, here are a few ways you can contribute to the empowerment of your community’s youth.

 

  1. When a teen worker serves or helps you at a local business, greet them warmly and give them a compliment (on their good work, their unusual hairstyle, or what have you). Be patient with young workers in your community. They are new to the workforce, and they will make mistakes. Be supportive instead of showing irritation.

 

  1. If you know a young person who is starting a new job (especially their first job), congratulate them. Maybe celebrate with lunch and a tour of your own workplace. Tell them about your job, and ask them about the job they have been hired to do. Encourage them to ask lots of questions!

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

Squawk cast: Ep. 52 – Homeschooling and Neuroscience

Join your hosts Jill Mann and Diana Stinn for a cup of Phoenix BIRD ORGANIC coffee and a lively discussion about the “new” science of neuroscience and 6 projects from around the world. Maybe you are employing science techniques and didn’t know it!

Ep. 52 – Homeschooling and Neuroscience

  Date: Sept. 26,  2015

Time: 16 minutes (A short one this time!)

Listen Here: 

Show Notes:

  1. Introductions
  2. Bird Brain – Discussion about an article called “6 Ways Schools are using Neuroscience to Help Kids Learn” by Emily Matcher – Smithsonian, Sept 24, 2015
  3. Nest News — (1) Kinder bins (2) Hand-washing stations (3) Field trips and (4) Google Apps for education
  4. Under Our Wing – Questions from parents (1) refunds  (2) Waivers
  5. Good Egg, Bad Egg – Nothing
  6. Wing Feather – Mart Family
  7. Close – Ok, from Jill Mann and Diana Stinn, we wish you a successful start to your new year!

Show notes can be found at Phoenixfoundation.ca   You can email comments about this podcast to info@phoenixfoundation.ca

Diana Stinn is our producer and does the editing. Apple provided the music and Aubrey does that deep wonderful intro and close!

Thanks very much for listening.