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School Not Working Out?

Check out a Home Education Program!

Phoenix is still accepting mid-year rescue students into our home education program. Unfortunately, the deadline for funding has pasted, you can still home educate!

How does it work?

There is a $50.00 for first time students. This creates your file, updates the government records and sets up your Phoenix account. You will need your student’s birth certificate. Phoenix charges $80.00 per month (minimum $200) for access to a facilitator. She is a an Alberta certified teacher with experience in home education. She is her to help you and is required to write two reports for Alberta Education on the progress of your student.

You need to fill out the home education notification form. (See the Support and Forms tab) This is a government form so read carefully. You will need a Phoenix waiver if you plan to participate in any onsite school opportunities or field-trips. You can download our Program Guides and have a look at all the classes we offer – availability subject to space.

Next step is creating your education plan for your student. This needs include what you plan to teach, what resources and how you will know your student is learning. We have a template you can use to help with this step.

Not sure what to put into the plan?

We recommend you look at the Alberta Education website for the kinds of things students at each grade level study. Then go shopping and have a look at what great commercial resources are available.

You are responsible for:

  • Paying the appropriate fees
  • Creating and designing the program
  • Supplying all the resources
  • Teaching your student
  • Keeping samples of work
  • Meeting at least twice with your facilitator over the school year

We will make sure you get 2 handbooks – one for Phoenix and one from the government, a copy of your ed plan, a copy of the regulations and any other paperwork you will need. We will notify your past school, so that you do not have to go back. We also have a variety of resources you can look though and select to help you get started!

Got questions?

Please feel free to call for more information or book an appointment to come for a tour! We are here to help!

 

 

Developmental Asset #11: Family Boundaries

Adolescence is a time of shifting roles and responsibilities, for both kids and parents. For many kids, it’s a time of rebellion, of bucking against parental authority. As your kids become more independent and capable, they will be taking on more responsibility for their actions, and family rules and expectations may change. It is important to be flexible in the face of these changes, but it is also vitally important to maintain boundaries and rules in your family. Your children need to know that their actions have consequences. Here are a few important things to remember.

 

  1. Monitor your teens’ whereabouts. Always ask where they are going, with whom, and when they will be home.

 

  1. Hold your kids of all ages accountable for their behaviour online. This is a challenging area for parents who feel like they’re less web-savvy than their children, but let them know early on that you’re tracking their activity online, and then make sure that you do it. Don’t try to trap them – instead, if they’re aware of your monitoring, they are more likely to use the Internet responsibly. Parenting.com has this very helpful article with the provocative title “How to Spy on Your Child Online.” It’s a worthwhile read about why it’s so important to monitor your kids’ online activity, how you can do it, and how to do it in the right spirit, with a clean conscience. Internet safety is about more than just protecting your kids from predators, scams, and viruses now – it’s also about how the wrong social media post can adversely affect their futures.

    For your younger kids and preteens, Google has a new program called Be Internet Awesome. It has resources for educators (that’s you!), a pledge for family members to sign, and an online game to help kids learn about sharing with care, protecting personal information, distinguishing fact from fiction, and respect for others.

3. When your teen lashes out at you, try to respond with love, not with anger. Say something like, “I’m sorry that you’re feeling that way right now, and I love you, but the way you’re behaving is not okay.”

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Parenting Preteens with a Purpose: Navigating the Middle Years by Kate Thomsen

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

 

Join Little Passports and open up new worlds.

When you click on the link below, not only are you opening up a whole new world of educational opportunities for your student, you are also contributing to the school as we have become an affiliate of Little Passports. So click away and find out more!

http://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=789372&u=1653861&m=32333&urllink=&afftrack=

Developmental Asset #10: Safety

Adolescents do better in all areas if they feel safe and secure in their homes, schools, and neighbourhoods. It is also vitally important that they be well-informed about safety now that they are becoming more independent. Here are some ways you can help create a safe and secure environment for your adolescent, but remember, you’re not alone – seek help from professionals, police, and other caring adults in your community when you have a safety concern.

 

  1. First and foremost, create a loving, violence-free home. If there is ever a time when you feel angry or upset enough to become physically or emotionally violent with your teen, remove yourself from the situation immediately. Leave the room. You may want to call a trusted friend or counselor, go for a walk, or visit a neighbour. The important thing is that you physically leave your teen for however long it takes to cool down.

 

  1. If you think your child’s safety or the safety of someone else is endangered, or if your child is engaging in risky behaviour of any kind, don’t wait. Act now. Intervene, and enlist others’ help to do so. If necessary, seek professional support.

 

  1. Bullying threats that mention weapons or explosives must be taken seriously and reported to police.

 

  1. Talk openly and honestly with your child about drugs and alcohol, especially in relation to driving. Encourage them to ask questions.

 

  1. Talk to your child about the relationship between driving and emotions, and let them know that driving while distracted, angry, or sad can be as dangerous as driving impaired.

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis and Helping Teens Handle Tough Experiences: Strategies to Foster Resilience by Jill R. Nelson and Sarah Kjos

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

Developmental Asset #9: Service to Others

This is closely related to Developmental Asset #8: Youth As Resources. Young people are empowered when they have opportunities to serve others, especially when it becomes part of their regular routine. There are many ways for your adolescent to provide meaningful service. Here are just a few.

 

  1. Encourage your teen to organize or join a cleanup crew for a residential area or park.

 

  1. Work together with your teen to help someone in need. Help an older neighbour with yard work or household maintenance. Bring food to someone in your community who is grieving or sick. Maybe ask Miss Lisa at Phoenix, who runs our Care Program, whether there are any Phoenix families who could benefit from your help or support.

 

  1. Volunteer together for a charity. If you make financial contributions, consider helping your teen to do so as well. Ask them whether they have their own cause in mind that they would like to support.

 

  1. Provide foster care for a pet through your local animal shelter.

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis and The Best of Building Assets Together: Favorite Group Activities That Help Youth Succeed by Jolene Roehlkepartain

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

National Music Centre

Field trip – Nov 10, 2017 – National Music Center

  • Gr. 2-5
  • Date: Friday, Nov. 10th
  • Time: 12:45-3:45pm
  • Address: 850-4 Street SE

National Music Centre – Card quest (Gr. 2-5)

With their trusty iPad map in hand, students are lured through the stages of Studio Bell- solving riddles, learning new skills, observing musical demonstrations, and testing their abilities. Each task they complete wins them a customized card, with pictures and descriptions. At the end of the day, take your card collection back to class and keep them as learning tools and as part of an interactive game.

Pre-registration is required. Program cost: $14.00/student – $5.00/adult

Register at: frontdesk@phoenixfoundation.ca

Developmental Asset #8: Youth As Resources

A community serves its young people well when it treats them as valuable resources. As parents, teachers, and community members, here are a few ways you can empower adolescents by giving them useful roles.

 

  1. If you’re in charge of a charity fundraiser, celebration, or other event, involve your teenagers. Give them meaningful tasks so that they can contribute to your event’s success. If you run a business or charity, employ young people and help them succeed at the jobs you give them.

 

  1. Encourage your teens to support their peers, to listen and be there for them when they need help. Being a supportive friend is good for your teen’s self-esteem.

 

  1. Encourage your teens to act as positive role models for younger children. Maybe get them involved in Phoenix’s mentorship program. If you have a younger child, encourage positive relationships with well-adjusted teens who share their interests.

 

  1. Encourage entrepreneurship in teens. Hire neighbourhood kids to shovel your walk, mow your lawn, or babysit. Encourage your own teens to think of creative ways to earn money through their own marketable skills.

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.

Developmental Asset #7: Community Values Youth

It is an asset for adolescents to perceive that they are valued by the adults in their community. As an adult member of your own community, here are a few ways you can contribute to the empowerment of your community’s youth.

 

  1. When a teen worker serves or helps you at a local business, greet them warmly and give them a compliment (on their good work, their unusual hairstyle, or what have you). Be patient with young workers in your community. They are new to the workforce, and they will make mistakes. Be supportive instead of showing irritation.

 

  1. If you know a young person who is starting a new job (especially their first job), congratulate them. Maybe celebrate with lunch and a tour of your own workplace. Tell them about your job, and ask them about the job they have been hired to do. Encourage them to ask lots of questions!

 

RECOMMENDED READING: Empowering Youth: How to Encourage Young Leaders to Do Great Things by Kelly Curtis

 

Search Institute has identified 40 building blocks of healthy development, known as Developmental Assets, that help adolescents to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible. Visit us here every Wednesday to read about different ways that you, your family, and your community can take action to help equip our young people develop resilience and achieve success in life.